02_machining - Machining Techniques Dimensions, Tolerance,...

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Machining Techniques Machining Techniques Dimensions, Tolerance, and Measurement Dimensions, Tolerance, and Measurement Available Tools Available Tools
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Winter 2012 UCSD: Physics 121; 2012 2 Why Machine Stuff? Why Machine Stuff? Research is by definition “off-road” Research is by definition “off-road” frontier work into the unknown You can’t just You can’t just buy buy all the parts all the parts mounting adapter between laser and telescope first-ever cryogenic image slicer Although there are some exceptions Although there are some exceptions optical work often uses “tinker toy” mounts, optical components, and lasers cryogenics often use a standard array of parts biology, chemistry tend to use standardized lab equipment Often you have to design and manufacture your own Often you have to design and manufacture your own custom parts custom parts learning about the capabilities will inform your design otherwise designs may be impractical or expensive
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Winter 2012 UCSD: Physics 121; 2012 3 Critical Information Critical Information If you ask a machinist to make you a widget, they’ll If you ask a machinist to make you a widget, they’ll ask: ask: what are the dimensions? what are the tolerances? huge impact on time/cost what is the material? impacts ease of machining how many do you want? when do you need it/them? what budget does this go on? • at $50 to $80 an hour, you’d best be prepared to pay! We’ll focus on the first two items We’ll focus on the first two items
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Winter 2012 UCSD: Physics 121; 2012 4 Dimensions Dimensions You want to make a part that looks like the one above You want to make a part that looks like the one above How many dimensions need to be specified? How many dimensions need to be specified? each linear dimension each hole diameter (or thread type) 2-d location of each hole total: 22 numbers (7 linear, 5 holes, 10 hole positions)
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Winter 2012 UCSD: Physics 121; 2012 5
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Winter 2012 UCSD: Physics 121; 2012 6 Notes on previous drawing Notes on previous drawing Some economy is used in dimensioning Some economy is used in dimensioning repeated Φ 0.129 diameter holes use 4 × to denote 4 places 4 1 connected center marks on holes allow single dimension 8 4 Numbers in parentheses are for reference (redundant) Numbers in parentheses are for reference (redundant) Dimension count: Dimension count: 16 numbers on page 6 linear plus 2 reference (don’t count) 6 hole position, representing 10 2 hole descriptors, representing 5 total information: 21 numbers (equal height of tabs implied) note: depth mark on 0.129 holes is senseless note: depth mark on 0.129 holes is senseless artifact of the way it was made in SolidWorks
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Winter 2012 UCSD: Physics 121; 2012 7 Standard views Standard views In American (ANSI) standard, each view In American (ANSI) standard, each view
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02_machining - Machining Techniques Dimensions, Tolerance,...

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