week6-1 - Exam#1 (chapter 1-6) time: Wednesday 02/15...

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Exam#1 ( chapter 1-6 ) time: Wednesday 02/15 8:30am- 9:20am Location: physics building room 114 If you can not make it, please let me know by Monday 02/13 so that I can arrange a make-up exam. If you have special needs, e.g. exam time extension, and has not contact me before, please bring me the letter from the Office of the Dean of Students before Monday 02/13. AOB ~20 problems Prepare your own scratch paper, pencils, erasers, etc. Use only pencil for the answer sheet Bring your own calculators No cell phones, no text messaging which is considered cheating. No crib sheet of any kind is allowed. Equation sheet will be provided.
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Momentum and Impulse How can we describe the change in velocities of colliding football players, or balls colliding with bats? How does a strong force applied for a very short time affect the motion? Can we apply Newton’s Laws to collisions? What exactly is momentum ? How is it different from force or energy? What does “ Conservation of Momentum ” mean?
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What happens when a ball bounces? When it reaches the floor, its velocity quickly changes direction. There must be a strong force exerted on the ball by the floor during the short time they are in contact. This force provides the upward acceleration necessary to change the direction of the ball’s velocity. F net m a m v t
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Momentum and Impulse Multiply both sides of Newton’s second law by the time interval over which the force acts: The left side of the equation is impulse , the (average) force acting on an object multiplied by the time interval over which the force acts. How a force changes the motion of an object depends on both the size of the force and how long the force acts.
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course PHYS 214 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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week6-1 - Exam#1 (chapter 1-6) time: Wednesday 02/15...

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