Bio171-F10-Lec 9 - Biology 171 Monday, September 27, 2010...

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Biology 171 Monday, September 27, 2010 Announcements This Week’s Discussion: Competition Exam I – Wed. Sep. 29 Text Reading: Lecture 9: 4 th : Chapter 53 (1066-1070), Ch. 31 (586-587) 3 rd : Ch. 53 (1205-9), Ch. 28 (572-3), Ch. 31 (672-3) Lecture 10: 4 th : Chapter 53 (1070-1072), Ch. 54 (1086-1089) 3 rd : Chapter 53 (1209-12); Ch. 54 (1226-30) Induced animal defenses Predator-prey cycles Commensalism Parasitism: Schistosomiasis; host impact Mutualisms Mycorrhiza; Nitrogen Fixing bacteria Co-evolutionary context of interactions Ants: Putting it all together Competitors/Mutualisms/Enslavers/Ranchers/Farmers 1
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Induced Animal Defenses 23 Fig. 53.11
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24 Fig. 53.11
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Fig. 53-12 25
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26 Fig. 53-12
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Are Animal Predators EfFcient Enough to Reduce Prey Populations? ±ig. 52-11 27
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Fig. 52-12 28
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29
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Interspecific Interactions Relationships between species of a community. 2
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Sharks and other larger marine vertebrates are often accompanied by a suite of commensal Fsh including pilot Fsh and remoras Commensalism A symbiotic relationship in which one organism benefits but the other is neither helped nor harmed. 3
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Phoresy – a type of commensalism where one animal uses another animal agent for dispersal. The mites shown here riding on beetles live in patchy habitats to their preferred habitats. Apionoseius sp. ex Trox aequalis 5 different mite species ex Passalus sp. 4
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Parasitism is a (+/-) association where the benefiting organism (the parasite ) obtains food and often a permanent habitat from, and to the detriment to, another organism (the host ). Parasites differ from predators in that:
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course BIO 171 taught by Professor Josephinekurdziel during the Fall '08 term at University of Michigan.

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Bio171-F10-Lec 9 - Biology 171 Monday, September 27, 2010...

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