Bio171-F10-Lec 15 - Biology 171 Wednesday, October 13, 2010...

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Lecture 15: Asexual reproduction/Mitosis Biology 171 Wednesday, October 13, 2010 Metapopulations Human population growth (concluded) Cell Replication: How organisms grow Binary Fission & Mitosis Asexual Reproduction Overview of Mitosis Overview of the Cell Cycle Today’s Topics: Announcements Text Reading: Lecture 15: 4 th : Chapter 11 (194-209) 3 rd : Chapter 11 (229-249), Ch. 12 (258-260) Lecture 16: 4 th : Chapter 12 (211-227) 3 rd : Chapter 12 (243-262) This Week’s Discussion: Population Ecology Simulations Survey #3 available
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Metapopulations Many species in nature are not distributed evenly across a landscape and are present in groups of small, isolated populations. They are said to have a metapopulation structure —a population of populations. The history of a metapopulation is driven by the birth and death of populations , just as the dynamics of a single population are driven by the birth and death of individuals. 22
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23 Figs. 52.9-10
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Human population growth The global human population has grown almost continuously throughout history, but it skyrocketed after the Industrial Revolution. Though it is not apparent at this scale, the rate of population growth has slowed in recent decades, mainly as a result of decreased birth rates throughout the world. Recent growth is caused primarily by a historic decline in death rates, followed by a slower decline in birth rate. 24 Fig. 52.15
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Demographic transition A shift from zero population growth in which birth rates and death rates are high to zero population growth characterized instead by low birth and death rates. When fertility at the replacement rate is sustained for a generation—each woman producing exactly enough offspring to replace herself and her offspring’s father—zero population growth (ZPG) results. 25
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The age distribution of a population tends to be uniform in more developed countries and bottom-heavy in less developed countries ( Figure 52.14 ). 26
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(data from 2000). As of 2004, Afghanistan was growing at 2.6% per year, the United States was growing at 0.6% per year, and Italy was declining at 0.1% per year. 27
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course BIO 171 taught by Professor Josephinekurdziel during the Fall '08 term at University of Michigan.

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Bio171-F10-Lec 15 - Biology 171 Wednesday, October 13, 2010...

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