Bio171-F10-Lec 29 - Biology 171 Monday, November 22, 2010...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Biology 171 Monday, November 22, 2010 Lecture 29: Origins of Eukaryotes; Diversity of Protists Announcements Thanksgiving holiday No discussion this week Work on essay! Retroviruses (concluded) Endosymbiotic Origins of Eukaryotes Protist Diversity - New Phylogenetic Perspectives Photosynthesis & secondary Endosymbioses Malaria Trypanosomiasis Text Reading Lecture 29 : 4 th : Chapter 29 (519-537) 3 rd : Chapter 29 (593-623) Lecture 30 : 3rd & 4th: Chapters 32-34 (read for background & depth) 1 The HIV infection cycle. The cycle begins and ends with free HIV particles present in the bloodstream of its human host. These free viruses infect white blood cells that have a specific set of transmembrane proteins called CD4 receptors . Genetic impacts of Retroviruses & Transposable elements The HIV infection cycle. The cycle begins and ends with free HIV particles present in the bloodstream of its human host. These free viruses infect white blood cells that have a specific set of transmembrane proteins called CD4 receptors . Genetic impacts of Retroviruses & Transposable elements 33 A large fraction of the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA motifs, and much of this may have originated from retroviruses 34 35 Eukaryotic Animal Cell Prokaryotic Cell. Eukaryotic Cells represent a quantum leap in size and complexity. How did they evolve? 2 Prof. Lynn Margulis (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) In 1967, she proposed an endosymbiotic hypothesis for the origin of mitochondria : these organelles evolved from free-living bacteria that long ago entered into a symbiosis with ancestral eukaryotes . Similar proposals had previously been made for chloroplasts . She was initially criticized as a radical, and her scientific work was rejected by mainstream biology for many years. Her work later received widespread support and acclaim. Her hypothesis that the eukaryotic cell is a symbiotic union of primitive prokaryotic cells has been hailed as one of the great achievements of twentieth-century evolutionary biology Richard Dawkins 3 A model of the origin of eukaryotes through serial endosymbiosis....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course BIO 171 taught by Professor Josephinekurdziel during the Fall '08 term at University of Michigan.

Page1 / 37

Bio171-F10-Lec 29 - Biology 171 Monday, November 22, 2010...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online