Lecture+7+-+Family

Lecture+7+-+Family - Changing Family Forms Lecture 7 What...

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Lecture 7 Changing Family Forms
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Generally :  an institution is a recognized solution  to a social problem. More specifically:   an institution is an accepted  group of interdependent roles, values, and norms  that respond to important societal needs and that  reproduce themselves over time. What Are Social Institutions?
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What makes the  University of Michigan  an institution? What Are Social Institutions?
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The University is made  up of roles (e.g., Board  of Trustees, alums,  faculty, students) who  share the same values  and expectations that  students should receive  a world class education  and a degree at  graduation. What Are Social Institutions?
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Social Need Social Institution Socialization of new  members Family, Education Addressing members’  health Medicine Selecting members for  jobs Education, Labor Market Creating knowledge Science, Religion Exercising social control Law, Religion Defending against  enemies Government, Military Producing and exchanging  Economic system
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Institutions develop gradually and are unplanned.   People try a range of solutions to solve any social  problem and eventually some solutions are  accepted as the “best” way to meet their needs. The solutions we choose are not always the most  efficient but tend to be consistent with our social  values and norms. What Are Social Institutions?
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Over time, the “best” solution becomes  habitualized.   Institutionalized behavior seems logical and  natural and  right,  so the thought of solving the  problem some other way seems illogical,  unnatural, and  wrong . What Are Social Institutions?
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Social institutions are very slow to change. E.g., gender roles in the family Institutions are interdependent: change in one  social institution can cause changes in other  institutions. E.g., women workers during WWII What Are Social Institutions?
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WWII disrupted popular  notions of (middle-class  white ) women as too  physically and  emotionally fragile to  work in the paid labor  market. What Are Social Institutions?
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As women have  increasingly entered  the labor force, new  needs in the family  were created. E.g,. child care, 
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course SOC 100 taught by Professor Chen during the Winter '08 term at University of Michigan.

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Lecture+7+-+Family - Changing Family Forms Lecture 7 What...

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