09.02 - [Go around with names] [If there are new students:]...

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[Go around with names] [If there are new students:] Say your name Describe your academic and non-academic interests Say why you signed up for the course Say a little about your math background (esp. calculus) Talk about your best and worst math experiences Say your name again Any questions about this course? Can everyone view the 09.01.doc file? [Hand out time sheets.] Before we dive into Stewart, let’s “go back to high school”, and see if everything you were taught makes perfect sense, or whether it suggests that you weren’t told the whole story. Is 0.999… the same as 1.000…, and if so, why? ..?. .
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Intuitively, it seems to many students that since 0.9 < 1.0, and 0.99 < 1.00, and 0.999 < 1.000, and similarly for finite decimals of arbitrary length (no matter how large), the “<” should stay a “<” (and not become an “=”) when we replace a long finite string of 9’s by a string of infinitely many 9’s. This intuition is reinforced by the similarity between the words “infinite” and “indefinite”. But if we insist on having 0.999… and 1.000… represent
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course MATH 141 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at UMass Lowell.

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09.02 - [Go around with names] [If there are new students:]...

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