ElectronicsI_L5 - Lecture 5 Half-Wave Rectifier We can...

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Lecture 5
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Half-Wave Rectifier • We can revisit the simple rectifier circuit that we examined before for charging a battery: – It is referred to as a half-wave rectifier – This is because it only converts half the wave to DC. As we’ll see later you can get more than that. – It’s is not the best design because half the power of the incoming ac signal is unusable. – But it is very simple, as we have seen. • Last time we looked at it though, we only had the ideal diode model to work with. Now we can take another look with the more sophisticated models. • One thing to expect is there will be voltage losses due to the turn-on voltage and internal resistance of the diode.
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Knowing the complexities of the exponential model, we will want to avoid using that. Our choices for a model amount to: – Piecewise linear – Constant voltage drop – Small signal The ideal diode has been done already, so we don’t have that as an option. Not knowing the load resistance ahead of time, we will want to avoid the constant voltage drop; if the load has a small resistance, that model will be too inaccurate. The input sine wave crosses zero volts, so we can definitively rule out the small signal model.
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course PHYSICS 16.365 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '10 term at UMass Lowell.

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ElectronicsI_L5 - Lecture 5 Half-Wave Rectifier We can...

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