ElectronicsI_L6 - Lecture 6 Bridge over Troubled Water....

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Lecture 6
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Bridge over Troubled Water… There is an alternative to the center tapped solution of a full-wave rectifier: It is called a bridge rectifier, named after it’s resemblance to a wheatstone bridge Schematically, we can understand the operation of the bridge by tracing the flow of current through the device for both polarities: We see that no matter what the polarity, the current flows through the load in the same direction This has several advantages: No need for a center tapped transformer, which would be heavier due to the redundant secondary windings The breakdown voltage of the diodes need only be greater than V S rather than twice this value There is a disadvantage in that the voltage drop from the diodes will be double, due to the presence of two diodes in the conduction path.
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Filters • The pulsating nature of the output from the rectifier circuits makes them unusable for any electronic circuits. Batteries are about the only thing where this could be implemented. • We need a way to smooth out the pulses. • Capacitors are the simplest method to achieve this. – They get placed across the output of the rectifier – The larger the capacitor, typically the better it is. Electrolytic capacitors are most commonly used. – This is called the peak rectifier
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Filters II There are two ways to see how the capacitors will work: – The capacitor is configured as a low pass filter. With no resistor, the cut-off frequency is ideally 0 Hz, thus the only output will be DC – The other way to see the function of the capacitor is as a charge storage device. • When the output of the rectifier is high, the capacitor gets charged. • When the output falls, the capacitor fills in
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course PHYSICS 16.365 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '10 term at UMass Lowell.

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ElectronicsI_L6 - Lecture 6 Bridge over Troubled Water....

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