Lock_Automation_Project

Lock_Automation_Project - Department of Electrical and...

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Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 978-934-3300 University of Massachusetts Lowell Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 1 University Avenue, Ball Hall 301 Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 Proposal for a Remote Lock-Mechanism Controller: Canal Lock Automation Project Prepared By: Report Date: December 5, 2007 Prepared For: Dr. Joel Therrien University of Massachusetts Lowell Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Lowell, Massachusetts 01854
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ABSTRACT The Department of Electrical Engineering has designed an electronic system that will remotely control the mechanisms of the Hydro Locks. It will work in conjunction with the system of actuators that have been designed by the Department of Mechanical Engineering. This system will be used by boat operators to enable self-service passage through the Hydro Locks, thus alleviating the current burden of manual operation of the lock mechanisms. Where appropriate, interlocks will be implemented into the design to prevent the possibility of accidents from occurring. 1. INTRODUCTION The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has been tasked by the National Parks Service to design a system to allow the Hydro Locks to be operated remotely. The mechanisms that are currently operated manually will now be controlled by the transmitter shown in Figure 1. This transmitter is part of the inexpensive Rolling Code 10-Channel UHF Remote Control electronics kit which is inexpensive and available online. It is simple to control with just four buttons. This transmitter, operated remotely from aboard the boat, will control the lock mechanisms to allow passage through the lock. Implementing this system will alleviate the current burden of requiring someone from the National Parks Service to manually operate these systems. Figure 1. The transmitter that will remotely control the hydro lock. Each of the four buttons will control a separate component of the lock.
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The lock that will be the recipient of this system is seen in Figure 2. It is referred to as the “Hydro Locks” because it is located beneath the Pawtucket Street Bridge, adjacent to the hydro plant. Figure 2. The downstream Hydro Locks gate, looking from upstream end to downstream end (left). The upstream Hydro Locks gate, looking from downstream end to upstream end (right). At its most basic level, this lock consists of five components: a chamber, two gates, and two butterfly valves. The basic operation of the lock is as follows: someone from the National Parks Service opens the gate to allow a boat to enter the chamber. Once the boat is in the chamber, the gate is then closed. The upstream (downstream) butterfly valve is then opened to allow water to enter (exit) the chamber, thus raising (lowering) the boat along with it. Once this process is complete the gates in the fore- direction are opened and the boat is able to exit the chamber at a level of water different from the original.
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course PHYSICS 16.365 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '10 term at UMass Lowell.

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Lock_Automation_Project - Department of Electrical and...

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