final midterm 2 study guide

final midterm 2 study guide - 11/11/2011 16:50:00...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
11/11/2011 16:50:00 WORKSHEETS (check Learn@UW) Also check the Discussion Forum! Sexually Transmitted Infections and HIV Organisms that cause STIs: Immune system White blood cells (lymphocytes) and antibodies identify and try to eliminate bacteria. signs -> fever, vomiting, swelling, discharge, etc) Anatomical barriers: Natural barriers to prevent infection. skin, mucus, membranes, tears, earwax, Viruses- Non living organisms Do not reproduce by cell division Require a living host to multiply Capsules of genetic material (DNA or RNA) How virus attacks cell o Attacks a host cell and produces copies of the original virus at very fast rates. o Difficult to kill o May eventually kill the host cells Does not cause apparent change in the infected cell. Hard to see if cell is infects. Cell may die without us seeing it was infected by virus
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prevention and treatment o Vaccines Live vaccines (attenuated Non-live vaccines Bacteria - large group of unicellular “living” microorganisms Reproduce by cell division Can grow on organic and non-orgnaic matter Few species that are pathogenic (Chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, some forms of vaginitis) Treatment for bacteria: o Antibiotics: o Bacteriocidal = kill bacteria o Bacteriostatic = interrupt their growth and ability to multiply o Negative aspects: o Can also kill good bacteria, Can build up resistance, Allergies, Contraindications, can cause oral contraceptives not to work Protozoa HIV HIV: Retrovirus o RNA genetic information is copied/transcribed into DNA of the host cell (by reverse transcription). Transmitted person to person through blood, semen, and vaginal fluids (also pre- ejaculate, and breast milk)
Background image of page 2
How Immune system responds to HIV Two lymphocytes o B-cells (bone marrow) o T-cells (thymus) T-helper cells assist the T-cells stimulating them to signal B-cells o B-cells will produce antibodies to attack the specific virus Without a supply of T-helper cells, the immune system can not work. o T-helper cells do no stimulate T-cells o T-cells do not signal B-cells o B-cells do not produce antibodies T cell meanings HIV- 700-1000 T-cells in drop of blood HIV+ ("Normal") count above 500 cells T-cells below 200, immune system is highly compromised HIV becomes AIDs when: Immune system seriously damaged T-cell count less than 200 Opportunistic infections - (pneumonia, Kaposi's sarcoma and/or recurrent yeastinfection) Treatment Combination of antivirat drugs (ART) New vaccine???
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Issues related to menstruation Be able to define menarche, menstrual synchrony, dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea, endometriosis with its basic diagnosis and treatment. Identify what PMS, PMDD, and LLPDD stand for. Menstrual suppression. Reproductive rights and reproductive justice
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

final midterm 2 study guide - 11/11/2011 16:50:00...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online