developmental psychology - Chapter 8 Development module 25...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 8 19424166 Development module 25 developmental psychology, the study of the patterns of growth and change that occur throughout life the nature–nurture issue. In this context, nature refers to hereditary factors, and nurture to environmental influences If identical twins (those who are genetically identical The most frequently used, cross-sectional research, compares people of different ages at the same point in time. Cross-sectional studies provide information about differences in development between different age groups Cross-sectional research A research method that compares people of different ages at the same point in time Longitudinal research A research method that investigates behavior as participants age. Sequential research A research method that combines cross sectional and longitudinal research by considering a number of different age groups and examining them at several points in time.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chromosomes Rod-shaped structures that contain all basic hereditary information Genes The parts of the chromosomes through which genetic information is transmitted. Zygote The new cell formed by the union of an egg and sperm. Embryo A developed zygote that has a heart, a brain, and other organs. Fetus A developing individual, from eight weeks after conception until birth. Age of viability The point at which a fetus can survive if born prematurely. Teratogens Environmental agents such as a drug, chemical, virus, or other factor that produce a birth defect. Mother’s nutrition. What a mother eats during her pregnancy can have important implications for the health of her baby. Seriously undernourished mothers cannot provide adequate nutrition to a growing fetus, and they are likely to give birth to underweight babies. Poorly nourished babies are also more susceptible to disease Mother’s illness. Several diseases can have devastating consequences for a developing fetus if they are contracted
Background image of page 2
during the early part of a pregnancy. For example, rubella (German measles), syphilis, diabetes, and high blood pressure may each produce a permanent effect on the fetus Alcohol and nicotine use. Alcohol and nicotine are extremely dangerous to fetal development. For example, 1 out of every 750 infants is born with fetal alcohol syndrome ( FAS ), a condition resulting in below-average intelligence, growth delays, and facial deformities. FAS is now the primary preventable cause of mental retardation.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 10

developmental psychology - Chapter 8 Development module 25...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online