chapter13_part1 - CHAPTER 13 Chemical Bonding Lewis Dot...

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Unformatted text preview: CHAPTER 13 Chemical Bonding Lewis Dot Formulas of Atoms Formation of Ionic Compounds Formation of Covalent Bonds Lewis Formulas for Molecules and Polyatomic Ions Writing Lewis Formulas: The Octet Rule Resonance Writing Lewis Formulas: Limitations of the Octet Rule Polar and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds Dipole Moments The Continuous Range of Bonding Types Two types of bonds: o Ionic bonding results from electrostatic attractions among ions, which are formed by the transfer of one or more electrons from one atom to another. o Covalent bonding results from sharing one or more electron pairs between two atoms. o ( Metallic bonding in Chapter 16!) Sharing of electrons Atoms with similar electronegativities Atoms achieve pseudo-noble configurations Octet rule to create Lewis dot structures Transfer of electrons Network of cations and anions Metals (left) with non- metals (right) Atoms achieve pseudo- noble configurations Strong interactions due to large electrostatic forces (+/-) Covalent Ionic Covalent: Sharing Ionic: Transfer Electronegativities Lewis Dot Formulas of Atoms A s p p p A H H 1s 1 . H . Lewis Dot Formulas Li Be B C N O F Ne .. .. .. .. .. He H . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Elements that are in the same periodic group have the same Lewis dot structures. Li & Na . . N & P .. .. . . . . . . F & Cl .. . .. . . . . .. .. . Ionic Bonding Formation of Ionic Compounds An ion is an atom or a group of atoms possessing a net electrical charge. Ions come in two basic types: 4. positive (+) ions or cations 5. negative (-) ions or anions Metals react with non-metals Cations bind to anions Ionic compounds form extended three dimensional arrays of oppositely charged ions. Ionic compounds have high melting points because the coulomb force , which holds ionic compounds together, is strong. Remember: formula units, not molecules! Reaction of Group IA Metals with Group VIIA Nonmetals (s) 2(g) (s) o IA metal VIIA nometal 2 Na Cl 2 NaCl solid gas with an 842 C melting point Why not write it as: Na + Cl NaCl Formation of Ionic Compounds: electron configurations electron configurations of Na and Cl. 2s 3s 3p Na Cl These atoms form ions with these configurations : Na + same configuration as [Ne] Cl- same configuration as [Ar]...
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chapter13_part1 - CHAPTER 13 Chemical Bonding Lewis Dot...

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