leadership2-spring_2009

leadership2-spring_2009 - Two Situational Leadership...

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Two Situational Leadership Theories Fiedler’s Contingency Theory Vroom & Yetton’s Normative Theory of Leadership
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Fiedler’s Contingency Theory of Leadership Work group performance depends on the match between a leader’s style and the favorable of the situation. Good match = High performance team. Bad match = Low performance team
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Fiedler’s Contingency Theory of Leadership Fielder believed that leadership style was based on one’s personality and was therefore relatively fixed. Thus, Fiedler believed that most leadership training programs were useless.
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Fiedler’s Contingency Theory of Leadership Fiedler developed the Least Preferred Co- Worker Scale (LPC) to measure one’s leadership style. If you described your LPC in negative terms, you had a low LPC score and were considered a task-oriented leader. If you described your LPC in positive terms, you had a high LPC score and were considered a relationship-oriented leader.
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Fiedler’s Contingency Theory of Leadership Situational favorableness was determined by three factors: 1. Leader-Member Relations 2. Task Structure 3. Position Power Each of these three factors had two values and thus eight situations were possible.
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Fiedler’s Contingency Theory of Leadership Fiedler’s research on the theory found that: Low LPC (task-oriented) leaders were best in the very favorable and very unfavorable situations. High LPC (relationship-oriented) leaders were best in the moderately favorable conditions
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of Leadership Here are some of the implications of this theory:
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2012 for the course MGT 3200 taught by Professor Sauley during the Spring '06 term at LSU.

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leadership2-spring_2009 - Two Situational Leadership...

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