Manifestation - 1 A manifestation [William Walwyn, 14 April...

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1 A manifestation [William Walwyn, 14 April 1649] A manifestation from Lieutenant-Colonel John Lilburne, Mr William Walwyn, Mr Thomas Prince, and Mr Richard Overton (now prisoners in the Tower of London), and others, commonly (though unjustly) styled Levellers Intended for their full vindication from the many aspersions cast upon them to render them odious to the world and unserviceable to the commonwealth. And to satisfy and ascertain all men whereunto all their motions and endeavours tend, and what is the ultimate scope of their engagement in the public affairs They also that render evil for good, are our adversaries: because we follow the thing that good is. Printed in the year of our Lord, 1649 A manifestation from Lieutenant-Colonel John Lilburne, Mr William Walwyn, Mr Thomas Prince, and Mr Richard Overton (now prisoners in the Tower of London), and others, commonly (though unjustly) styled Levellers Since no man is born for himself only, but obliged by the laws of nature (which reaches all), of Christianity (which engages us as Christians), and of public society and government, to employ our endeavours for the advancement of a communitive happiness of equal concernment to others as ourselves, here have we (according to that measure of understanding God has dispensed unto us) laboured, with much weakness indeed but with integrity of heart, to produce out of the common calamities such a proportion of freedom and good to the nation as might somewhat compensate its many grievances and lasting sufferings. And although in doing thereof we have hitherto reaped only reproach and hatred for our good-will, and been fain to wrestle with the violent passions of powers and principalities, yet since it is nothing so much as our blessed Master and his followers suffered before us and but what at first we reckoned upon, we cannot be thereby any whit dismayed in the performance of our duties, supported inwardly by the innocency and evenness of our consciences. 'Tis a very great unhappiness — we well know — to be always struggling and striving in the world, and does wholly keep us from the enjoyment of those contentments our several conditions reach unto. So that if we should consult only with ourselves and regard only our own ease, we should never interpose as we have done in behalf of the commonwealth. But when so much has been done for recovery of our liberties, and seeing God has so blessed that which has been done as thereby to clear the way and to afford an opportunity which these six hundred years has been desired but could never be attained — of making this a truly happy and wholly free nation — we think ourselves bound by the greatest obligations that may be to prevent the
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2 neglect of this opportunity and to hinder as much as lies in us that the blood which has been shed be not spilt like water upon the ground, nor that after the abundant calamities which have overspread all quarters of the land, the change be only notional, nominal, circumstantial, whilst
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2012 for the course POLS 3136 taught by Professor Bazowski during the Winter '10 term at York University.

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Manifestation - 1 A manifestation [William Walwyn, 14 April...

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