Treatise - Philip Hunton A Treatise of Monarchy, Containing...

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Philip Hunton A Treatise of Monarchy, Containing Two Parts: I. Concerning Monarchy in General. II. Concerning This Particular Monarchy. Wherein All the Maine Questions Occurrent in Both, are Stated, Disputed, and Determined. . . . Done by an Earnest Desirer of His Countries Peace (1643)
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2 Part I. Chapter I Of political government, and its distinction into several kinds Section I Authority, how far from God, how far from men? Government and subjection are relatives; so that what is said of the one, may in proportion be said of the other. Which being so, it will be needless to treat of both; because it will be easy to apply what is spoken of one to the other. Government is potestatis exercitium, the exercise of a moral power. One of these is the root and measure of the other; which, if it exceed, is exorbitant, is not government, but a transgression of it. This power and government is differenced with respect to the governed; to wit, a family, which is called economical; or a public society, which is called political, or magistracy. Concerning this magistracy we will treat: 1. In general. 2. Of the principal kind of it. In general concerning magistracy, there are two things about which I find difficulty and difference, viz. the original, and the end. First, for the original: there seem to be two extremes in opinion; while some amplify the divinity thereof, others speak so slightly of it, as if there were little else but human institution in it. I will briefly lay down my apprehensions of the evident truth in this point; and it may be, things being clearly and distinctly set down, there will be no real ground for contrariety in this matter. Three things herein must necessarily be distinguished, viz.: 1. The constitution or power of magistracy in general. 2. The limitation of it to this or that kind. 3. The determination of it to this or that individual person or line. For the first of these: 1. It is God's express ordinance that, in the societies of mankind, there should be a magistracy or government. At first, when there were but two, God ordained it (Genesis 3: 16). St Paul affirms as much of the powers that be, none excepted (Romans 13: I). 2. This power, wherever placed, ought to be respected as a participation of divine sovereignty (Psalm 82: I, 6); and every soul ought to be subject to it for the Lord's sake (I Peter 2: 13): that is, for conscience' sake of God's ordinance (Romans 13: 5), and under penalty of damnation (verse
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3 2). These are truths, against which there is no colour of opposition. Indeed, this power may be claimed by them who have it not; and, where there is a limitation of this power, subjection may be claimed in cases which are without those limits, but to this ordinance of power, where it is, and when it requires subjection, it must be given, as before. For the second: 1. In some particular communities the limitation of it to this or that kind is an
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Treatise - Philip Hunton A Treatise of Monarchy, Containing...

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