RU EKG Class 2 11-1

RU EKG Class 2 11-1 - EKG Use & Interpretation...

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Unformatted text preview: EKG Use & Interpretation Presented by Carol Sadley, M.Ed., PA-C January 25, 2011 EKG Basics The EKG is a recording of the electrical activity of the heart. The first EKG machine was invented by Dr. Einthoven (hence our present-day UHIHUHQFH WR (LQWKRYHQV WULDQJOH Depolarization Moves from cell to cell, causing normal, resting negativity to change to positivity within each myocyte (heart muscle cell). Represents a flow of electricity Detected by surface electrodes Depolarization of the heart Repolarization Cardiac myocytes returning to their resting polarity (cell interiors return to negative ) when depolarization is complete. 3 Types of cardiac cells: Pacemaker Cells Electrical Conducting Cells Myocardial Cells Pacemaker Cells Recurrent, spontaneous depolarization, at a particular rate (60-100 bpm) Depolarization results in an action potential Dominant pacemaker = SA node Electrical Conduction Cells Long, thin cells that carry current to distant regions of the heart Divided into atrial and ventricular conducting systems Myocardial Cells Comprise the major part of heart tissue Responsible for the physical work of contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle Depolarization results in calcium release within the cell causing contraction Bipolar Limb Leads Bipolar means that the EKG is recorded from two electrodes on the body. Figure 11-6; Guyton & Hall Flow of Electrical Currents in the Chest Around the Heart _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + Mean Vector Through the Partially Depolarized Heart Normal Cardiac Conduction EKG Vectors Vectors and Electricity of the Heart EKG records electrical activity of the heart Vectors and Electricity cont....
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RU EKG Class 2 11-1 - EKG Use & Interpretation...

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