In_comparison_to_Adam_David_Miller edit 1

In_comparison_to_Adam_David_Miller edit 1 - Adam David...

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Adam David Miller, the narrator and protagonist of the memoir Ticket to Exile, talks about discusses a series of events that happened in Orangeburg County, South Carolina during the 1930’s. Specifically, we learn about the conditions of the racially segregated school he attended when he received his education. At the same time, through Jonathan Kozol’s research in his essay “Still Separate, Still Unequal”, he points out that schools which were greatly that were segregated twenty-five or thirty years ago are no less segregated now. He refines his argument by composing research at various schools that resulted in expectations of his claim. Through an analytical approach in comparing and contrasting the school Adam David Miller ’academic life in the 1930s attended during the 1930’s and Jonathan Kozol’s research of schools that were addressed by Jonathan Kozol in the year 2003, vast similarities are found in schools’ student ’s composition student enrollment , learning curriculum, and services and facilities. Through comparing and contrasting Adam David Miller’s academic life in the 1930s and Jonathan Kozol’s research of schools in the year 2003, despite some differences evident, vast similarities are found in student enrollment, learning curriculum, and services and facilities. Although there are differences in student enrollment, both Miller’s high school experience and Kozol’s research in schools emphasize racial inequality in student enrollment. In comparison to Adam David Miller’s experience in high school and Jonathan Kozol’s research in schools, racial inequality in student enrollment exists. schools that have been researched by Jonathan Kozol, there seems to be many similarities in terms of student composition present. When Miller received his education in Orangeburg County, South Carolina during the 1930’s, the Jim Crow laws—a series of rigid anti-Black laws—prohibited the blacks to be educated in schools with the whites. (Ferris) The school Miller attended—Dunton Memorial School—was designated for black people who could not afford better well-off black schools. The effect of Jim Crow laws has Overtime, the American society what is this part about? has progressed through the efforts of civil rights movement from the 1950’s; as a result, the Jim Crow laws no longer exist. However, Miller’s school has high enrollment rate of black students which demonstrates segregation of black students and white students. However, through Similarly , Kozol’s researched statistics, schools today are not necessarily 100 percent black. Although certain schools today show a great amount of black students present, at least the remaining 2 percent of the school’s composition is not made up of black students. I copy and pasted this from 2 nd paragraph. Jonathan Kozol
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emphasizes racial inequality through ’s essay of “Still Separate, Still Unequal”, such thought becomes skeptical
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2012 for the course LITR 137 taught by Professor W during the Winter '11 term at UCSD.

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In_comparison_to_Adam_David_Miller edit 1 - Adam David...

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