Sumit_s_CR_Strategy - Test Taking Strategy Critical...

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Test Taking Strategy Critical Reasoning On verbal part of the GMAT, you will encounter about 14 Critical Reasoning questions of various lengths (sometimes you will even need to scroll to read all the answer choices). In 99 per cent of cases, you will have a short passage with one question right under it. The argument you meet can be anything from a classical argument to an advertisement or a dialog. The questions will ask you to manipulate the argument to weaken/strengthen it, find the conclusion, assumption, explanation, do an inference, supplement a statement, or even tell how its parts are related to each other. On average, you will have 1:50 for each question, but it is recommended that you try to stay within 1:30 on CR (Critical Reasoning) questions since you will need to save some time for Reading Comprehension. It is recommended that you read through Kaplan's Verbal workbook or the Section of CR in the Kaplan GMAT book with CD, 5th edition. Both of the books are good for building a solid background; in our sessions, we will develop further the techniques described in these books, yet will not rely on them for exercises or anything else. First of all, Critical Reasoning is ability to reason clearly to evaluate and judge arguments. You are using this skill a lot during you everyday life while reading newspapers or watching movies. When you think that the movie is pushing the limit of the Reasonable or the news sounds less reasonable than the movie that was pushing the limit, you are using your CR skills to produce these conclusions. Besides the Verbal part on the GMAT, you will also need good argumentative skills to beat the essays since one of them is to construct an argument, and the other is to evaluate one. As a rule, GMAT CR questions will ask you to manipulate the argument to weaken/strengthen it, find the conclusion, assumption, explanation, do an inference or supplement a statement, etc. Whatever it is that you have to do, you will need 2 things to succeed: know the basic structure of arguments and clearly understand the argument. In general, about 80% of GMAT arguments consist of evidence, usually 2 pieces, a conclusion - the main point of an argument, and an assumption - the bridge between the evidence and conclusion. The majority of the arguments you encounter on the test will be 3 step arguments: Evidence1 + Evidence2 = Conclusion.
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Example 1 . Last week Mike was detained for shoplifting at a groceries store near his house, but he has been a Christian for 10 years, therefore, the police must have been wrong accusing him in stealing. We have here two pieces of evidence: Mike was accused of stealing and that his is a Christian.
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2012 for the course PHYSICS 321 taught by Professor M during the Spring '11 term at Jordan University of Science & Tech.

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Sumit_s_CR_Strategy - Test Taking Strategy Critical...

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