chap2 - Objectives In this course, we focus on these...

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© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public ITE 1 Chapter 6 1 Objectives In this course, we focus on these aspects of the information network: Devices that make up the network Media that connect the devices Messages that are carried across the network Rules and processes that govern network communications Tools and commands for constructing and maintaining networks This chapter prepares you to: Describe the structure of a network, including the devices and media that are necessary for successful communications. Explain the function of protocols in network communications. Explain the advantages of using a layered model to describe network functionality. Describe the role of each layer in two recognized network models: The TCP/IP model and the OSI model. Describe the importance of addressing and naming schemes in network communications.
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© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public ITE 1 Chapter 6 2 The Elements of Communication Communication begins with a message, or information, that must be sent from one individual or device to another. All of these methods have three elements in common . –The first of these elements is the message source, or sender. Message sources are people, or electronic devices, that need to send a message to other individuals or devices. The second element of communication is the destination, or receiver , of the message. The destination receives the message and interprets it. A third element, called a channe l, consists of the media that provides the pathway over which the message can travel from source to destination.
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© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public ITE 1 Chapter 6 3 Communicating the Messages In theory, a single communication, such as a an e-mail message, could be sent across a network from a source to a destination as one massive continuous stream of bits. If messages were actually transmitted in this manner, it would mean that no other device would be able to send or receive messages while this data transfer was in progress. A better approach is to divide the data into smaller, more manageable pieces to send over the network. This division of the data stream into smaller pieces is called segmentation .
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© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public ITE 1 Chapter 6 4 Communicating the Messages Segmenting messages has two primary benefits. First, by sending smaller individual pieces from source to destination, many different conversations can be interleaved on the network. The process used to interleave the pieces of separate conversations together on the network is called multiplexing . Second,
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2012 for the course NETWORKING NETW204 taught by Professor Baig during the Spring '09 term at DeVry Addison.

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chap2 - Objectives In this course, we focus on these...

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