chap10 - Planning and Cabling Networks Network Fundamentals...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public ITE I Chapter 6 1 Planning and Cabling Networks Network Fundamentals – Chapter 10 Modified by Tony Chen 02/19/2009
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public ITE 1 Chapter 6 2 Notes: If you see any mistake on my PowerPoint slides or if you have any questions about the materials, please feel free to email me at chento@cod.edu . Thanks! Tony Chen College of DuPage Cisco Networking Academy
Background image of page 2
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public ITE 1 Chapter 6 3 Objectives Upon completion of this chapter, you will be able to: Identify the basic network media required to make a LAN connection. Identify the types of connections for intermediate and end device connections in a LAN. Identify the pinout configurations for straight-through and crossover cables. Identify the different cabling types, standards, and ports used for WAN connections. Define the role of device management connections when using Cisco equipment. Design an addressing scheme for an internetwork and assign ranges for hosts, network devices, and the router interface. Compare and contrast the importance of network designs.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public ITE 1 Chapter 6 4 LAN Device: Router Routers are the primary devices used to interconnect networks. –Each port on a router connects to a different network and routes packets between the networks. –Routers have the ability to break up broadcast domains and collision domains. –Routers are also used to interconnect networks that use different technologies. They can have both LAN and WAN interfaces. The router's LAN interfaces allow routers to connect to the LAN media. This is usually UTP cabling, but modules can be added for using fiber-optics. Depending on the model of router, there can be multiple interface types for connection of LAN and WAN cabling. Each LAN will have a router as its gateway connecting the LAN to other networks. Inside the LAN will be one or more hubs or switches to connect the end devices to the LAN. For this course, the choice of which router to deploy is determined by the Ethernet interfaces that match the technology of the switches at the center of the LAN.
Background image of page 4
© 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public ITE 1 Chapter 6 5 Intranetwork Devices LAN Device: Hub and switch Hub –A hub receives a signal, regenerates it, and sends the signal over all ports. –The use of hubs creates a logical bus. –This means that the LAN uses multiaccess media. –The ports use a shared bandwidth approach and often have reduced performance in the LAN due to collisions and recovery. –Multiple hubs can be interconnected, they remain a single collision domain.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/12/2012 for the course NETWORKING NETW204 taught by Professor Baig during the Spring '09 term at DeVry Addison.

Page1 / 39

chap10 - Planning and Cabling Networks Network Fundamentals...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online