PALec9 - The Rise of Bipedalism Early Hominid Evolution Lecture 9 Bipedalism and Early Hominids Part 1 Bipedalism The main hallmark of hominids is

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The Rise of Bipedalism: Early Hominid Evolution Lecture 9
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Bipedalism and Early Hominids Part 1
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Bipedalism The main hallmark of hominids is bipedalism (walking upright). This is among the more rare traits in the animal world.
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Ostrich
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Kangaroo
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Jerboas
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T-rex
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Brian
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Theories of Bipedalism 1 It has long been theorized by anthropologists that bipedalism arose in hominids as an adaptation to grassland living. As climates changes and forests vanished hominids that could walk upright would have advantages over those that couldn’t.
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Bipedalism: Potential Advantages Generally more efficient than knuckle walking (energetically). Much more efficient for walking long distances (relatively slowly) in grassland environments. Frees hands for other uses. Allows for better long-distant vision.
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Bipedalism: Potential Advantages 2 Upright primates dissipate heat better than quadrupeds. Allows for feeding from tall trees. Allows for males to increase chances of reproductive success.
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Disadvantages of Bipedalism Though more more energetically efficient in the long run, for short distances bipedal hominids are often slower than their quadruped relatives. Grassland life makes primates more vulnerable to predation.
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Bipedalism Rethought Recent discoveries of very early hominids, which existed before the occurrence of large-scale forest loss have caused some scientists to rethink earlier grassland-based theories regarding the evolution of bipedality in hominids. Among the most controversial is one proposed by C. Owen Lovejoy of Kent State University.
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Lovejoy’s Theory of Bipedality Bipedality is a forest adaptation , which arose as a way of incorporating males into the child rearing process. This would improve the energy allocation of these species and allow for greater potential birthrates .
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Lovejoy’s Theory of Bipedality 2 Apes are relatively unsuccessful animals in the Darwinian sense, in that they have limited reproductive potential due to the fact that most the child rearing is done by the female. Bipedality frees the males hands for gathering
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2012 for the course ANTH 2 taught by Professor A during the Spring '08 term at Irvine Valley College.

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PALec9 - The Rise of Bipedalism Early Hominid Evolution Lecture 9 Bipedalism and Early Hominids Part 1 Bipedalism The main hallmark of hominids is

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