PALec15 - Geography Resources and Power Lecture 15 The...

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Geography, Resources, and Power Lecture 15
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The Geography of Inequality Part 1
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Basic Facts For humans today the world is fundamentally a place of inequality. Some people have much greater access to material goods, education, and general social opportunity than others. Because of this, some people have much greater social, economic, and political power than others.
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Poverty (Living on Less Than a Dollar a Day)
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Literacy Rates
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Fertility Rates
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Infant Mortality and Income
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Population Growth
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HIV Percentages
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Life Expectancy
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America’s World View
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Some Conclusions Though there are many exceptions and much variation in the data, poverty (starvation), disease, low life expectancy,high birth rates, lack of education, corrupt and repressive governments, and war generally go together. These factors also create a de facto imperialism, in that countries that are more democratic, better educated, etc. become wealthier and in some sense control these less “developed” nations.
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Explanations for Inequality Part 2: Broad Evolutionary Patterns of Human Cultural Groups
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Fundamental Questions Why have Eurasian Cultures been largely dominant over other cultures? Why did Europeans come to rule large chunks of the world, both physically and economically? Why don’t Sub-Saharan Africans or Australian Aboriginals rule the world?
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Traditional Answers Some cultures dominate others because they are biologically superior . Some cultures dominate others because they are “morally” superior . There is no scientific evidence to support either of these explanations.
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Recently UCLA’s Jared Diamond put forth the “Guns, Germs, and Steel” theory of human cultural development. This theory states that
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PALec15 - Geography Resources and Power Lecture 15 The...

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