Chapter 8 Social Stratification

Chapter 8 Social Stratification - Social Stratification...

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Social Stratification
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Social Stratification Social stratification – a system by which a society ranks categories of people in a hierarchy. Stratification is a trait of society. It persists over generations. It is universal, but variable. It involves not just inequality, but beliefs
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The Kuznet’s Curve HUNTING AND GATHERING INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY Less Stratification =
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Caste Systems A caste system – social stratification based on ascription or birth. Example: India Birth alone determines one’s destiny . There is little opportunity for social mobility. (closed social mobility)
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Class Systems A class system – social stratification based on both birth and individual achievement. Even blood relatives may have different social standings. Meritocracy – based on personal merit and achievement. (Open social mobility)
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Closed Social Mobility Found in a Caste System Very Rigid People placed in system by social status Based on ascribed status Ideology: must follow caste rules Some movement allowed: Horizontal —(movement of equal positions)
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Open Social Mobility Found in a Class System Very Fluid People placed in system by wealth/income Based on Achieved Status Ideology: EDUCATION JOB OPPORTUNITIES AN “EVEN PLAYING FIELD” Social mobility either vertical or horizontal
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Structural Functionalist Since social stratification exists in all societies, a hierarchy must therefore be beneficial in helping to stabilize their existence.
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Structural Functional Davis-Moore Thesis Social inequality plays a vital role. The Davis-Moore Thesis stratification has beneficial consequences for the operation of a society. Certain jobs can be performed by almost anyone. Other jobs demand the scarce talents of people with extensive training. The greater the importance of a position, the more rewards attached to it.
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Stratification and Conflict inaccessibility of resources lack of social mobility Conclusion: Stratification based on economic inequalities and shaped by status and power differentials.
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Stratification and Conflict Stratification provides some people with advantages over others.
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Chapter 8 Social Stratification - Social Stratification...

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