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Parker Stinnett Module 2, DB 2 COLLAPSE Offender rehabilitation programs are extremely important when it comes to the decrease in recidivism of offenders returning to communities. As a correctional professional, it is my job to give offenders both incarcerated and on probation the resources needed to address their criminogenic needs so when they are in the community they can be successful, law abiding citizens. In order to do this, programs must be utilized both in the institution as well as during post-release supervision. Generic rehabilitation programs should be specific to meet the needs of the offender and the population as a whole. Therefore, I believe generic rehabilitation programs should be adapted to meet the needs of various offender populations such as sex offenders, juveniles, females, etc. but I believe they should be run in connection with specific programs as well. For example, sex offenders need more attention to certain criminogenic needs than someone who is a violent offender, and vice versa. While some programs would be beneficial to both, there also needs to be specific programs as well due to each offender having a different background. An offender could have been abused or neglected, or even sexually assaulted and therefore need a different form of treatment. In Pacheco and Birkbeck (1996), it is stated that due to different types of trauma and abuse, the need for treatment to adapt to fit the offender is necessary. Furthermore, when types of crime are different, so are the assessments of treatment; for example, violent offenders use the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide and sex offenders would use the Abel Assessment for Sexual Interest (Gideon & Sung, 2011). The treatment for a violent offender may include anger management techniques, where a sex offender would need treatment for possible psychological issues. The other way around or both taking the same program would not reduce recidivism a lot; it may have some effect, but not a major effect. Making groups more specific rather than generic can help reduce recidivism. Furthermore, gender-specific programing should be adapted as well. For example, there is a parenting class that the Virginia Department of Corrections uses and it is gender specific. Why you might ask? How would a man benefit from a parenting class that focuses on skills for women, or vice versa? The answer is they would not. In my opinion, gender-specific programs are just as important as specific rehabilitation programs. Men and women process information differently and respond to skills differently. As mentioned in Gideon and Sung (2011), research on female and gender-specific groups is rare because the female offender population only makes up 8-18% of the total offender population. In a research study conducted of 886 females and 1,435 males yielded results that social and financial risk factors for offending are more substantial in women than men; thus meaning women need more programs specific to these needs, not men (Heilbrun et al., 2008). By making programs gender-specific, department of

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