Introduction to Particle Physics

Introduction to Particle Physics - What are the Elementary...

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What are the Elementary Constituents of Matter? What are the forces that control their behaviour at the most basic level?
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History of Constituents of Matter AD
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In Nuclear Reactions momentum and mass-energy is conserved – for a closed system the total momentum and energy of the particles present after the reaction is equal to the total momentum and energy of the particles before the reaction In the case where an alpha particle is released from an unstable nucleus the momentum of the alpha particle and the new nucleus is the same as the momentum of the original unstable nucleus
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0 0 1 1 1 1 0 υ + + - e p n Large variations in the emission velocities of the β particle seemed to indicate that both energy and momentum were not conserved. This led to the proposal by Wolfgang Pauli of another particle, the neutrino, being emitted in decay to carry away the missing mass and momentum. __
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Introduction to Particle Physics - What are the Elementary...

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