Chap3a - Develop a Fitness Program Chapter 3 Caroline...

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Unformatted text preview: Develop a Fitness Program Chapter 3 Caroline Laubacher Simpkins PhD Student, Applied Physiology Bachelor of Science, Physical Activity muscular movement of the body results in significant energy expenditure above the resting metabolism Examples? Exercise structured physical activity Physical Activity vs Exercise Physical Fitness – a developed physical capacity that enables people to… Perform routine physical tasks with vigor Participate in a variety of physical activities Reduce their risk for chronic diseases Two categories: Health-related Physical Fitness Three Fundamental Components: 1. Cardiorespiratory/Aerobic Fitness 2. Musculoskeletal/Muscular Fitness 3. Body Composition Health-Related Physical Fitness Cardiorespiratory Lowers risk of premature death (heart disease, stroke) Musculoskeletal Increase bone density, muscle mass, and joint health Lowers risk for osteoporosis, low back pain, degenerative joint disorders Body Composition Protects against obesity, diabetes, heart disease, Benefits of Health-Related Physical Fitness Agility Speed Coordination Balance Associated primarily with sport & motor skill performance, but may have clinical importance (ex. Importance of balance with older adults) Skill-Related Physical Fitness Source: http://www.clevelandwomen.com/people/dominique- moceanu.htm How do we produce energy for muscle contraction? Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) = “energy currency of cells” Very small amounts stored in body - can only supply energy for few seconds Must be replenished via anaerobic and aerobic pathways How the Body Responds to Exercise Biochemical pathways that do not require oxygen to produce energy for muscle contraction Relatively short-lived pathway Uses glucose and glycogen as energy source in absence of O2 High energy output for approx. 30 seconds (ex. sprinting, high intensity weight lifting) By product: lactic acid Anaerobic Metabolism Biochemical pathways that use oxygen to produce energy muscle contractions Provides moderate energy for several hours Distance running, cycling, swimming Depends on cardiorespiratory system Aerobic Metabolism Source: http://rmiles.files.wordpress.com/2010/0 2/swimmer.jpg Lungs breathe in oxygen...
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2012 for the course HPS 1040 taught by Professor Surrency during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Tech.

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Chap3a - Develop a Fitness Program Chapter 3 Caroline...

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