Elbert Lecture 2010 - Tissue Responses to Biomaterials...

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1 Engineering endothelial cell interactions with biomaterials Donald L. Elbert BME 140 2010 1. Implantation 2. Biomaterial Protein adsorption 3. Monocytes/macrophage Tissue Responses to Biomaterials Proteins involved in wound healing adsorb on biomaterials, recruiting cells involved in wound healing and causing cells to adopt a wound healing phenotype Biomaterial 4. PDGF, FGF,interleukins TGF D , E , EGF, TNF 5. Foreign body giant cells 6. Fibroblasts, ECM 7. Extracellular matrix Biomaterial 8. Encapsulation Figure 5.7: Images of Flow Reattachment Points at Two Flow Rates. Images on the left refer to a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min while images on the right refer to a flow rate of 0.75 ml/min. From top to bottom, images show (1) CFD predictions of particle CFD predictions of particle traces, highlighting the flow reattachment point; (2) experimental flow cells with thrombi growing in Area III at the flow reattachment point; and (3) SEM of early platelet adhesion (1 minute perfusion time)±note the heavy band of platelet adhesion at the flow reattachment point. From the Ph.D. dissertation: THE DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE HEMODYNAMIC MODEL OF DEVICE-INDUCED THROMBOEMBOLISM By Paul D Goodman, Brigham Young University, 2003 A B Figure 7.15: Visualization of Thrombus Growth in Area I: SEM, VM, and CFD. A) Two example SEM images (different flow cells) of thrombus growth in a PE flow cell in Area I, identified with arrows. Flow was from left to right at 0.75 ml/min for five minutes. B) Video microscopy images of thrombus growth in Area I at various perfusion times. Flow was from left to right C at 0.75 ml/min through PE flow cells. Images were enhanced using image subtraction. C) CFD model predictions of thrombus growth in Area I after 35 seconds of simulated flow. On the left, the thrombus is shown relative to the size of the flow cell. On the right, a close up of the thrombus is shown. Flow is from left to right at 0.75 ml/min; time steps were 0.01 seconds. From the Ph.D. dissertation: THE DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE HEMODYNAMIC MODEL OF DEVICE-INDUCED THROMBOEMBOLISM By Paul D Goodman, Brigham Young University, 2003 ePTFE grafts for vascular access -(CF 2 -CF 2 ) n - A-V graft for vascular access, used for hemodialysis. Thrombi removed from ePTFE A-V graft.
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2 Massive thrombosis in the lesser orifice has led to the total immobilization of a Lillehei-Kaster mitral valve prosthesis Thromoboembolism with mechanical heart valves Stein et al., Chest, 114:602S-610S, 1998 INR = International Normalized Ratio, a measure of coagulation state •Ventricular assist device (with external pump) Abiomed BVS5000 •“Abiocor” TAH (made from “Angioflex” polymer , polyurethane, including the valves) Total artificial heart Left ventricular assist device REMATCH trial – medical therapy versus cardiac assistance Rose et al., New England Journal of Medicine, 345:1435-1443, 2001 R ANDOMIZED E VALUATION OF M ECHANICAL A SSISTANCE FOR THE T REATMENT OF C ONGESTIVE H EART FAILURE, Patients were ineligible for heart transplant Flocked surfaces These Velcro-like structures encourage thrombus formation, but not thromboembolism (maybe a little).
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2012 for the course NUBITRY 3304 taught by Professor Various during the Spring '01 term at Albertus Magnus.

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Elbert Lecture 2010 - Tissue Responses to Biomaterials...

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