Lecture3.7.19.2011.PersonalityPsych.Summer2011

Lecture3.7.19.2011.PersonalityPsych.Summer2011 -...

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Unformatted text preview: Instructor: George Chavez Lecture 3 7/19/2011 Personality is the dynamic organization within the individual of those psychophysical systems that determine his unique adjustments to his environment Gordon Allport, Personality: A Psychological Interpretation But if you add enough of them together, you get a decent picture of the person He was curious He was introverted She was adventurous Traits are not complete descriptions of individuals Theyre more like abbreviations A great number of varying definitions exist Traits Internal dispositions that account for cross-situational consistency in behavior People are rarely completely consistent Everyone is inconsistent No one is perfectly Open-Minded or Disagreeable Traits are normally distributed. . . Agreeableness Very few people are EXTREMELY low in agreeableness Very few people are EXTREMELY high in agreeableness Galen Maybe bodily humors affect temperament? Black Bile: Melancholy Blood: Sanguine (Confident) Humorism William Sheldon suggested body morphology indicated personality traits Endomorphs : Easy-going, agreeable Ectomorphs : Introverted, neurotic Mesomorph : Aggressive, courageous Quite stereotypical Freud was fairly prominent when Allport was studying psychology, so he arranged a meeting in Vienna The aim was to Converse with a colleague Freud doesnt just have conversations Allports Theory of Motivation The principle that motives may have both distal ( historical ) and proximal ( current ) reasons for existing. Often, proximal reasons for motives are more central to a personality. The need to arise originates in our earliest memories of maternal care. For, as infants, when we arise, we are greeted by the presence of sustenance (breast milk) that we eventually tie to sexual gratification. To wake up is to yearn for that metaphorical milk, the hope of gratification driving our arousal. Why do we wake up in the morning? In the same way the dog salivates for meat, we too salivate for food, money, and similar reinforcements. There is not an innate need to wake up in the morning. There is simply the expectation that something good will come of it. Give me control over a man for two weeks, and by scheduling his meals to coincide with his proximity to bed and eventual laying down, Ill have him salivating for sleep in the morning. Why do we wake up in the morning? When young, the boy awakes for fear of punishment upon coming late to school. As an adult, the excitement of a fulfilling career...
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Lecture3.7.19.2011.PersonalityPsych.Summer2011 -...

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