R&Dlab10 - Lynh Pham Karlyn Cotlow Jacquelynh Ho...

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Lynh Pham Karlyn Cotlow Jacquelynh Ho Results Figure 1: This graph shows the % transmittance at varying concentrations of ascorbic acid. Figure 2: This graph shows the average concentration of urine ascorbic acid in 20 minute intervals, with experimental manipulations introduced, such as Vitamin C and aspirin. Time 0 is the control. Discussion Reabsorption and secretion involve two different routes for the movement of solutes: transepithelial transport and the paracellular pathway (Silverthorn, 2010). Ascorbic acid is a water-soluble molecule and depends on membrane proteins for intestinal and renal absorption. It is transported by secondary active transport through sodium-dependent transporters. If high amounts of Vitamin C are consumed, not all of it will be reabsorbed, therefore some must be excreted in the urine. Once it reaches renal threshold for Vitamin C, the remainder will be excreted into the urine. When Vitamin C occupies all binding sites on a transporter protein, the ascorbic acid concentration has reached its transport maximum, the transport rate at saturation. In
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R&Dlab10 - Lynh Pham Karlyn Cotlow Jacquelynh Ho...

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