Reactivity of Metals - Reactivity of Metals INTRODUCTION:...

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Reactivity of Metals INTRODUCTION : The chemistry of the metals is based on their ability to lose electrons. Differences in chemical reactivity between two metals depend upon the relative ease with which the metals give up electrons. The ease with which metals lose electrons is reflected in the activity series of metals. In the activity series, metals are listed in order of ease of loss of electrons to from positively- charged ions. One way to measure the reactivity of metals is to place a small piece of a pure metal in a solution containing the ions of another metal. If the metal is more reactive than the metal whose ions are in solution, electrons will be transferred from the metal to the metallic ion. For example, iron is above copper in the activity series. When a piece of iron is placed in a solution containing copper (II) ions, such as copper (II) nitrate, the following reaction occurs spontaneously. Fe
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Reactivity of Metals - Reactivity of Metals INTRODUCTION:...

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