Gu_heart regeneration_Nov17

Gu_heart regeneration_Nov17 - demonstrate this regenerative...

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Department of Biomedical Engineering University of Southern California Heart Regeneration Laflamme, M. A. & Murray, C (2011). Nature, 473, 326-335.
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l o x P Cre Cre recombinase & loxP
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Cardiomyocytes specific IoxP Genetic fate mapping (ZF)
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Apex Pre-existing cardiomyocytes are the main source for regeneration Genetic fate mapping (ZF)
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Heart Regeneration in Rodents § Like zebrafish hearts, postnatal mammalian hearts also undergo cardiomyocyte renewal but to a lesser degree § Transgenic mouse models used to observe dividing cardiomyocytes in mammalian hearts
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Genetic fate mapping (Mouse)
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Genetic fate mapping (Mouse)
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Genetic fate mapping (Mouse) § As indicated by the 15% difference in GFP+ labelled progenitor cells, a significant amount of cardiomyocyte renewal was from progenitors, not from pre-existing cardiomyocytes
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Heart Regeneration in Rodents § One-day-old neonatal mice, which have mononucleated cardiomyocytes, demonstrated a regenerative response similar to that of adult zebrafish § Seven-day-old mice, with cardiomyocyte binucleation, did not
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Unformatted text preview: demonstrate this regenerative capacity Human cardiomyocytes are polyploid due to active DNA synthesis without nuclear division Human Heart Regeneration No significant macroscopic regeneration or mitosis has been observed 14C measurements by Bergmann et al. showed 1% - 0.4% annual renewal rate IdU treatments study by Kajstura et al. estimated 22% annual turn over rate (possibly due to high DNA synthesis activities) Cardiomyocyte division or generation from progenitor cells probably occurs in the human heart, but it seems to be a very slow process Summary Zebrafish Mouse Human DNA synthesis Active: Diploid nuclei Active Binuclei, diploid Active Polyploid Regeneration Rate Highly active upon Injury Active for neo-natal Moderate renewal rate at for adults Not at significant level Regeneration Mechanism Cardiomyocyt e proliferation Cardiomyocyte proliferation for neo-natal Progenitor cell for adults Both (at very low level)...
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Gu_heart regeneration_Nov17 - demonstrate this regenerative...

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