9_8_11_ControlAndSynthesisOfTissues

9_8_11_ControlAndSynthesisOfTissues - Outline of the...

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Outline of the Lecture Synthesis of Tissues: Bioreactors and Cultures Bioreactors Control of Cell Cultures
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Choosing Bioreactors and Cultures Well Is Key in Tissue Engineering
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Pioneers of tissue engineering: In skin- substitute products, allogeneic cells are seeded onto a biode- gradable matrix and cultured ex vivo. Advanced Tissue Sciences and Organogenesis
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Example of closed systems: An artificial liver provides support by using a dialysis system, bringing plasma in contact with hepato- cytes. Advanced Tissue Sciences and Organogenesis Cells Plasmapheresis Device Oxygenator Charcoal Column Plasma Pump Plasma Reservoir Bioreactor
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In this lecture, we will consider two keys components of tissue- engineering technology: bioreactors and cultures. Advanced Tissue Sciences and Organogenesis Cells Plasmapheresis Device Oxygenator Charcoal Column Plasma Pump Plasma Reservoir Bioreactor
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In functional tissue engineering, one cultures cells in 3D scaffolds, controls parameters with bioreactors, and then transplants tissues.
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To improve integration between engineered and host cartilage (A,B), a study put cultures within rings of different media (C-F). Genzyme Biosurgery
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Engineered cartilage increases with mass transport of gas (B,C) and insulin- like growth factor (IGF- I; D,E), and convective mixing (D,E). Genzyme Biosurgery
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Spinning bioreactors have the advantage of better laminar flow (A-C); a computa- tional model predicts the growth of the tissue from the flow (D-F). Genzyme Biosurgery
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Culture systems, specially the use of appropriate bioreactors for seeding and cultiva- tion have a larger effect than scaffolds of growth of tissue. Genzyme Biosurgery
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Culture duration steadily (A) increases amount of engineered cartilage (B,C), as the scaffold de- grades (B); compressive modulus also rises (D).
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Mechanical conditioning modulates DNA (A), collagen (B), and tensile strength (D), but not stiffness (C), in engineered cardiac tissue. Genzyme Biosurgery
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Primary explantation places a fragment of tissue at a solid-liquid interface (A, dark area) and collects the outgrowth (B) enzy- matically for passage. Genzyme Biosurgery
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To form a subculture, one often trypsinizes the parent culture to free the cells, and then count, dilute, and reseed them. Genzyme Biosurgery
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The growth curve of a culture has a lag phase, an exponential phase, and a saturation phase.
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Summary Bioreactors are culture systems to distribute cells on scaffolds, to mass transfer of necessary factors, and to provide appropriate conditioning. One must carefully choose cell-culture parameters and characterization tools.
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2012 for the course BME 410 taught by Professor Han during the Fall '08 term at USC.

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9_8_11_ControlAndSynthesisOfTissues - Outline of the...

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