12~chapter 12

12~chapter 12 - Materials: engineering, science, processing...

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Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon
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Thermal Properties Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Two temperatures directly relate to the strength of a material • Melting temperature T m • Glass temperature T g Crystalline materials have a defined temperature at which they melt – non-crystalline solids are characterized by a temperature at which they transition from a true solid to a very viscous liquid
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Operating Temperatures Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Materials have a maximum and minimum service temperature T max – highest temperature at which the material can be used continuously without oxidation, chemical change or excessive distortion T min – temperature below which the material becomes brittle or otherwise unsafe to use
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Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 12.1 Energy needed to heat 1 kg of a material by 1 K Heat Capacity C p Figure 12.2 Thermal strain per degree of temperature change Thermal Expansion Coefficient α Figure 12.3 Thermal Conductivity λ Rate at which heat is conducted through a solid at steady-state
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Thermal Diffusivity Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Thermal conductivity measures the flow of heat at steady-state – transient heat flow is governed by the thermal diffusivity (m 2 /s)
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Thermal Expansion - Conductivity Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 12.4 Contours show thermal distortion parameter λ/α
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Thermal Diffusivity - Expansion Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2012 for the course MASC 310 taught by Professor Nutt during the Fall '08 term at USC.

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12~chapter 12 - Materials: engineering, science, processing...

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