13~chapter 13

13~chapter 13 - Materials: engineering, science, processing...

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Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon
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Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Temperature Dependence Figure 13.1 Some material properties have a linear dependence on temperature while others may have an exponential relationship Figure 13.2
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Viscous Flow and Creep Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Strain rate in very viscous fluids from an applied tensile stress Creep – slow, continuous deformation of a material at elevated temperatures, ending in fracture
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Creep Testing Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 13.3 Specimen is loaded in tension or compression, usually at a constant load, inside a furnace that is maintained at a constant temperature
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Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 13.4 Steady-state creep rate The constants ε 0 , σ o , n , and Q c are experimentally found and vary from material to material
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Stress-Rupture Curve Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 13.5 Design data based on creep is generally presented in a stress-rupture curve – allows you to identify either the design stress or rupture life at a given temperature
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Melting Point Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 13.6 The temperature at which a material starts to creep depends on its melting point Polymers can start to creep at room temperature Metals - 0.35 T m Ceramics - 0.45 T m
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Strength – Maximum Service Temperature Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 13.7
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2012 for the course MASC 310 taught by Professor Nutt during the Fall '08 term at USC.

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13~chapter 13 - Materials: engineering, science, processing...

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