14~chapter 14

14~chapter 14 - Materials: engineering, science, processing...

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Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon
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Electrical Behavior Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 14.1
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Resistivity and Conductivity Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 14.2 Electrical resistivity is the measure of a materials resistance to current passing through it – conductivity is the inverse of this Resistivity values for materials have an immense range – 1 - 10 24
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Dielectric Properties Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 14.3 Dielectric constant Measures the the ability of a material to polarize Dielectric loss factor Measures the energy dissipated when radio- frequency waves pass through a material Dielectric breakdown potential Electrical potential gradient at which an insulator breaks down and a damaging surge of current flows through it Figure 14.4
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Thermal Conductivity – Electrical Resistivity Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 14.5 Electrical resistivity has a wider range of values than any other material property
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Strength – Electrical Resistivity Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 14.6
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Strength – Dielectric Loss Factor Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 14.7
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Conductivity Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Electrons of an atom occupy discrete energy states or orbits, arranged in shells – each shell is made up of sub-shells each of which contain one, three, five, or seven orbits, respectively Electrons fill the shells with the lowest energy with two electrons of opposite spin in each orbit When a large number of atoms are brought together to form a solid, the inner electrons remain with their initial host atom, but the outer ones interact Figure 14.8
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14~chapter 14 - Materials: engineering, science, processing...

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