20~chapter 20

20~chapter 20 - Materials: engineering, science, processing...

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Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon
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Material Consumption Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 20.1 10 billion tonnes of engineering materials consumed per year – steel, more than 10X more than any other metal, and construction materials such as concrete and wood are the most heavily used materials
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Growth of Consumption Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 20.2 Most materials are being consumed at a rate that is growing exponentially with time – based on current data, steel consumption doubles every 18 years while polymer consumption doubles every 14 years At a global growth rate of just 3% per year we will mine, process, and dispose of more ‘stuff’ in the next 25 years than in the entire history of human engineering
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Life-Cycle Assessment and Energy Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon Figure 20.3 Energy and materials are consumed at every point in a products life-cycle – ore and feedstock are mined and processed to yield a material – this is manufactured into a product that is used, and then discarded or recycled Life-cycle assessment is used to evaluate the eco-impact throughout all cycles of a products life, from extraction of the ore to possible recycling – carbon dioxide and other emissions such as heat and gaseous, liquid and solid wasted are collectively known as environmental ‘stressors’ which LCA attempts to identify and quantify
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Embodied Energy and CO 2 Footprint Materials: engineering, science, processing and design, 2nd edition Copyright (c)2010 Michael Ashby, Hugh Shercliff, David Cebon The embodied energy
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2012 for the course MASC 310 taught by Professor Nutt during the Fall '08 term at USC.

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20~chapter 20 - Materials: engineering, science, processing...

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