Limits to Moores Law

Limits to Moores Law - Limits to Moore's Law Running head:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Limits to Moore’s Law 1 Running head: LIMITS OF MOORE’S LAW: IS THE END NEAR?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Limits to Moore’s Law 2 Abstract In 1965, Gordon Moore stated that “the number of transistors and resistors on a chip doubles every 18 months.” This statement has remained fairly accurate for the past four decades but many experts have indicated the end of Moore’s Law is quickly approaching. Through innovative technology engineers have crammed the features of the semiconductor chips so tightly together that the conventional methods of chip production are reaching their physical limits. Chip makers must move away from photolithograpical techniques which are now at the edge of the ultraviolet range into alternatives including extreme ultraviolet lithography, nanocomputing, quantum computing or some other unprecedented technology. Regardless of which technology shows the promise to ensure the exponential growth of computing power, the technology must be cost effective and be able to mass produce the chips. At this point, the majority of the technology will be in the infancy so the question remains if a suitable alternative technology can be utilized for the continuation of Moore’s Law or will Moore’s Law end.
Background image of page 2
Limits to Moore’s Law 3 For more than four decades, there has been an unbreakable principle of the computer industry: every 18 months, the number of transistors that will fit on a silicon chip doubles. The phenomenon first appeared in the article “Cramming more components onto integrated circuits” published in Electronics on April 19, 1965. Gordon Moore was the director of R&D at Fairchild Semiconductor initially wrote an internal paper which contained a line through five points representing the number of components per integrated circuit for minimum cost per component developed between 1959 and 1964 (Moore, 1965) . Prior to publishing, the paper was titled “The Future of Integrated Electronics” and attempted to predict “the development of integrated electronics for perhaps the next ten years.” (Moore, 1965) Moore extrapolated the trend to 1975 to predict that the number of components per chip would reach 65,000; this translated into a doubling every 12 months. At this point, Moore’s Law is approaching a point where the conventional technology will no longer be able to maintain the demands of perpetuating Moore’s Law, although certain new technologies may be able to sustain it for awhile. Moore noted that advances in photolithography, wafer size, process technology, and “circuit and device cleverness,” especially in semiconductor memory arrays, had allowed the projection to be realized (Moore, 1975). Including more recent data along with a higher mix of microprocessor designs that were somewhat less dense than memories, Moore modified the rate of increase in complexity to a “doubling every two years, rather than every year.” (Moore, 1975) Moore, who was co-founder of Intel four years after making his prediction, used his prediction as one of the driving principles of the semiconductor industry.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/15/2012 for the course MBA 101 taught by Professor X during the Spring '11 term at Shawnee.

Page1 / 20

Limits to Moores Law - Limits to Moore's Law Running head:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online