Quantum_Computing

Quantum_Computing - Quantum Computing 1 Running head: POWER...

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Quantum Computing 1 Running head: POWER AND USE OF QUANTUM COMPUTERS
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Quantum Computing 2 Abstract Quantum computing is the exciting future for computing process power. This technology is just in its infancy and incorporates mathematics, theoretical physics and computer science. This new science has the potential to move computing power far beyond the limits of Moore’s Law but advances in quantum computing will be seen as slow when compared to classical computing advances. These slow advances have caused for some to doubt that quantum computing will deliver on the potential. The hardware needed for a quantum computer is developing but beyond this the software and application of a quantum computer is also still being developed. The paper will provide a brief but detailed introduction and history of the quantum computing but will focus on the current research and potential of the quantum computing discipline. The obstacles in building a quantum computer will also be discussed.
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Quantum Computing 3 Claude Shannon discovered how to quantify information as binary bits – a “1” or “0” – which can represent any number, or combinations of logical operations. Many can attribute this to the start of the “information technology revolution” that has seen exponential growth with computing power, known as Moore’s Law. Moore’s Law states, the number of transistors on a microprocessor continues to double every eighteen months, the year 2020 or 2030 we will find the circuits on a microprocessor measured on an atomic scale. With Moore’s Law quickly approaching its physical limits, does this mean computing power will have reached its limit or can there be a different technology that will allow us to break through this barrier to achieve faster, more powerful and infinitely more efficient computing? The answer to continue this is quantum computing. To break through Moore’s Law and continue to increase the computing power one of the next step could be to create a quantum computer. A quantum computer “exploits quantum mechanical interactions in order to function; this behavior, found in nature, possesses incredible potential to manipulate data in ways attainable by machines today” (Benenti, 2004). Basically a quantum computer will harness the power of the atoms and molecules to perform memory and processing tasks. Quantum computers have the potential to perform calculations significantly faster than any silicon- based computers. The fundamental building block for the classical computer is the bit, which each bit can hold either a one or zero. Since quantum computers are devices that make use of quantum mechanical phenomena, such as superposition and entanglement, to perform operations on data, the fundamental building block can exist in more than the two distinct states. Quantum superposition is the simultaneous coexistence of often
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Quantum Computing 4 contrary states. A quantum binary digit (qubits),which represent atoms, photons or electrons, exists as a zero, a one or it can be in a coherent superposition of both states
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Quantum_Computing - Quantum Computing 1 Running head: POWER...

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