{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

2.2 Understanding Your Communication Style

2.2 Understanding Your Communication Style - Understanding...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Understanding Your Communication Style
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Learning Objectives Understand the concept of communication style bias and its effect on interpersonal relations Realize the personal benefits that can be derived from an understanding of communication styles Discuss the major elements of the communication style models Identify your preferred communication style Improve communications with others through style flexing Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin
Background image of page 2
Communication Style It is the patterns of behavior that others can observe This is because others have no way of knowing your innermost thoughts and feeling, so they make decisions about you on what they see and hear Each person has a unique communication style. By getting to know your style, you can achieve greater self-awareness and learn how to develop more effective interpersonal relations with co-workers. Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fundamental Concepts Supporting Communications Styles Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin
Background image of page 4
Individual differences exist and are important Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Individual style differences tend to be stable Every individual develops a primary communication style that remains quite stable throughout life Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin
Background image of page 6
There is a limited number of styles Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A communication style is a way of thinking and behaving A style refers to how someone likes to do something Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin
Background image of page 8
To create the most productive working relationships, it is necessary to get in sync with the behavior patterns (communication style) of the people you work with. Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Communication Style Bias The bias is likely to surface when you meet someone who displays a style distinctly different from your own. How to cope with communication style bias? Ø Develop awareness of your own unique style Ø Learn to assess the communication style of those people with whom you have contact Ø Adapt your own preferred style to it. (speak the other person’s language) Source: Reece & Brandt, 2002, Effective Human Relations- Personal and Organizational Applications, 8th Ed, Houghton Mifflin
Background image of page 10
Do you believe in saying things that people want to hear?
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}