Chapter 4.5

Chapter 4.5 - Where do dislocations come from ? The number...

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21 MSE 2090: Introduction to Materials Science Chapter 4, Defects in crystals The number of dislocations in a material is expressed as the dislocation density - the total dislocation length per unit volume or the number of dislocations intersecting a unit area. Dislocation densities can vary from 10 5 cm -2 in carefully solidified metal crystals to 10 12 cm -2 in heavily deformed metals. Where do dislocations come from ? Most crystalline materials, especially metals, have dislocations in their as-formed state, mainly as a result of stresses (mechanical, thermal. ..) associated with the forming process. The number of dislocations increases dramatically during plastic deformation (Ch.7). Dislocations spawn from existing dislocations, This picture is a snapshot from simulation of plastic deformation in a fcc single crystal (Cu) of linear dimension 15 micrometers. http://zig.onera.fr/DisGallery/3D.html
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22 MSE 2090: Introduction to Materials Science Chapter 4, Defects in crystals
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2012 for the course MSE 2090 taught by Professor Leoindzhiglei during the Fall '10 term at UVA.

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Chapter 4.5 - Where do dislocations come from ? The number...

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