week 6 lecture notes

week 6 lecture notes - CT Chapter 3 Premises and Conclusion...

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Reminders: For discussion sections: Fri Feb 25/Mon Feb 28 James Rachels, Active and Passive Euthanasia Assignment #5: Due March 1st at class time. Critical Thinking: The Art of Argument, Questions 3.2 D 1-10 (p. 96) 3.3 A 5-10 (p. 105) 3.4 C 5-12 (pp. 111-2) Review: 1. What are some of the serious harms that can result from superstitious thinking, wishful thinking, self- deception, rationalization or the placebo effect? 2. How can we combat suppression and denial (defense mechanisms of which we aren ʼ t consciously aware)? 3. How does a good sense of proportion relate to procrastination? 4. How do provincialism, the herd instinct and scapegoating impair cogent reasoning? 5. Is critical thinking relative? CT: Chapter 3 - Premises and Conclusion 1
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Three Kinds of Premises: 1. Empirical Statements 2. Definitional Statements 3. Statements by experts/authorities Empirical Statements - statements that report what people observe through their senses Examples 3.1 A - which ones are empirical statements? 1. Blue is the most popular color. 5. Cats and dogs make good pets. 13. Pens are writing instruments made with ink inside a tube. - uncontroversially true: may be assumed to pass the true premises test (often omitted in enthymemes) - testimonial empirical statements: reports of what others have experienced - consider reliability - consider plausibility CT: Chapter 3 - Premises and Conclusion 2
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Definitional Statements
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