week 7 lecture notes

week 7 lecture notes - CT: Chapter 4 - Language Identifying...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Identifying DeFnitions - deFnition: a statement that gives the meaning (or proper use) of a word - extension (reference): the collection of things in the noun or verb class - intension (meaning): the collection of features that all of the members of the class have in common Example: ʻ Clark Kent ʼ , ʻ Superman ʼ - two names with the same extension, but different intensions Personal pronouns, such as ʻ I ʼ - same intension (the speaker), but different extensions (depends on who is speaking) CT: Chapter 4 - Language 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Genus and Species - genus: group to which the thing being defned belongs - species: the Feature or Features that distinguish the thing being defned From other things in the main group Examples: Classical Defnitions oF ʻ human being ʼ : - Plato ʼ s: man is a Featherless (species) biped (genus) (Diogenes ʼ response: a plucked chicken) - Aristotle ʼ s: man is a rational (species) animal (genus) CT: Chapter 4 - Language 2
Background image of page 2
Dictionary Defnitions - defnitions that state the common usage oF words, generally using the genus/species Format Technical Defnitions - defnitions that provide a more precise or specifc usage (which oFten doesn ʼ t match general usage) Examples: Exercise 4.3 A - Which ones are dictionary defnitions and which are technical defnitions? Indicate whether technical defnitions are being used For convenience, a new thing, greater precision or For a theory. 2. A magazine is a periodical containing miscellaneous pieces (as articles, stories, poems) and oFten illustrated. 3. ±or the purposes oF this document, “magazine” reFers only to a room in which gunpowder is kept in a Fort. 15. “only setbacks oF interests that are wrongs, and wrongs that are setbacks to interest, are to count as harms in the appropriate sense.” Note: - Acronyms: words Formed by the initial letters oF all the main words in a phrase (e.g.: SCUBA) CT: Chapter 4 - Language 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Evaluating Defnitions - a good defnition is accurate and clear - correct extension: not too narrow (excludes entities that belong to the class) or too broad (includes entities that don ʼ t belong) - correct intension: 1. points to central or essential Features oF a class oF entities, rather than coincidental Features 2. excludes metaphorical language (not clear and accurate), unnecessary negations (merely tells us what an entity is not) or synonyms (isn ʼ t inFormative unless you know the meaning oF the synonym) Examples oF poor defnitions: 1. Plato ʼ s defnition oF man as a Featherless biped 2a. Shakespearean quote that ʻ LiFe is a tale told by an idiot ʼ 2b. an apple is not an orange
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

week 7 lecture notes - CT: Chapter 4 - Language Identifying...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online