NYT_China’s Policies Ensure Sta..-1

NYT_Chinaâ - China's Policies Ensure State Enterprises Grow NYTimes.com http/www.nytimes.com/world/asia/30china.html?pagewant Reprints

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Reprints This copy is for your personal, noncommercial use only. You can order presentation-ready copies for distribution to your colleagues, clients or customers here or use the "Reprints" tool that appears next to any article. Visit www.nytreprints.com for samples and additional information. Order a reprint of this article now. August 29, 2010 By MICHAEL WINES BEIJING — During its decades of rapid growth, China thrived by allowing once-suppressed private entrepreneurs to prosper, often at the expense of the old, inefficient state sector of the economy. Now, whether in the coal -rich regions of Shanxi Province, the steel mills of the northern industrial heartland, or the airlines flying overhead, it is often China’s state-run companies that are on the march. As the Chinese government has grown richer — and more worried about sustaining its high-octane growth — it has pumped public money into companies that it expects to upgrade the industrial base and employ more people. The beneficiaries are state-owned interests that many analysts had assumed would gradually wither away in the face of private-sector competition. New data from the World Bank show that the proportion of industrial production by companies controlled by the Chinese state edged up last year, checking a slow but seemingly inevitable eclipse. Moreover, investment by state-controlled companies skyrocketed, driven by hundreds of billions of dollars of government spending and state bank lending to combat the global financial crisis. They join a string of other signals that are fueling discussion among analysts about whether China, which calls itself socialist but is often thought of in the West as brutally capitalist, is in fact seeking to enhance government control over some parts of the economy. The distinction may matter more today than it once did. China surpassed Japan to become the world’s second-largest economy this year, and its state-directed development model is enormously appealing to poor countries. Even in the West, many admire China’s ability to build a first-world infrastructure and transform its cities into showpieces. Once eager to learn from the United States, China’s leaders during the financial crisis have reaffirmed their faith in their own more statist approach to economic management, in which private capitalism plays only a supporting role. “The socialist system’s advantages,” Prime Minister Wen Jiabao said in a March address , “enable China’s Policies Ensure State Enterprises Grow - NYTimes.com http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/30/world/asia/30china.html?pagewant. .. 1 of 6 1/18/2011 3:32 PM
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us to make decisions efficiently, organize effectively and concentrate resources to accomplish large undertakings.” State vs. Private The issue of state versus private control is a slippery one in China. After decades of economic reform, many big state-owned companies face real competition and are expected to operate profitably. The biggest private companies often get their financing from state banks, coordinate
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2012 for the course GEO 273 taught by Professor Gentry during the Spring '08 term at Syracuse.

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NYT_Chinaâ - China's Policies Ensure State Enterprises Grow NYTimes.com http/www.nytimes.com/world/asia/30china.html?pagewant Reprints

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