Women Workers - A Brief Look Changed after industrial...

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Unformatted text preview: A Brief Look Changed after industrial revolution New system cast men into the role of wage earners and women as home-makers. Supreme Court decision, Muller v. Oregon, solidified the general impression of the times that women were the weaker sex and needed to be protected from the rigors of labor. This arrangement wasnt an option for poor families and single mothers who needed jobs to survive. WWII: Six million new women workers entered the labor force and took heavy industry jobs formerly available only to men. Even though they were doing the same work, and in some cases, better work, they werent paid the same as the men. When the war ended, many women had to give up their high paying jobs to make room for returning veterans. The entertainment and advertising industries portrayed the American wife and mother as totally devoted to domesticity post WWII and almost unpatriotic if they wanted to keep their jobs, even if it was out of necessity. They wanted the breadwinner/home-maker arrangement to go back to pre-war times. Increasing numbers of women poured into the work force, taking positions in office work, retail...
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Women Workers - A Brief Look Changed after industrial...

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