night-caged bird cc

night-caged bird cc - James Yang Mr. Puma AP Language and...

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James Yang Mr. Puma AP Language and Composition 3/20/10 In the dead of night, no caged bird sings. No people talk. No music plays. Silence overtakes all. No matter how it is presented, silence is silence, and still conveys the hopelessness, fearfulness, and unpreparedness often associated with it. Both Maya Angelou in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and Elie Wiesel in Night present the silence that consumes them in different ways, contrasting each other in style and tone; however, they face the same fearful world, often unable to utter a single word. Although both may empathize with one another’s battle against silence, Maya is saved from that terrifying world and brought back into one where she is able express herself with truth and emotion, while Elie is forced into seclusion, unable to escape his prison. The difference between their two fates lies in one voice that Maya had the benefit of listening to, while Elie did not. The voice’s owner is less significant than its actual presence, as a person’s silence may be broken by any one’s lending support, but still completely alters the author’s outlook on the world. Maya had the support of one woman, Mrs. Flowers, who aided her and finally helped her break free from her silence, while Elie lived in a world where every man was for himself and he continued to struggle on his own. Although both authors convey that freedom from silence necessitates a helping voice, Maya Angelou utilizes a
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night-caged bird cc - James Yang Mr. Puma AP Language and...

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