Assigment 7

Assigment 7 - fishes that feed on the scales of their prey....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Dan Guerra 11/1/10 Natural selection is the driving force behind the evolution of species. In the case the African cichlid fishes, they have developed a range of genetic variations surrounding the formation of their oral jaws. The resulting jaws come from the different feeding habits that the species demonstrates, including attacking the prey from a more parallel approach instead of a perpendicular tactic. The research done in the two articles finds a direct relation exists between the force and velocity of the fishes’ feeding technique and the shape of their jaws. One of the more interesting jaw formations is one in which one side of the jaw is shorter than the other side. The resulting asymmetrical jaw is characteristic of the cichlid
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: fishes that feed on the scales of their prey. Unlike symmetrical jaws, which require the fish to swim at a more perpendicular approach to attack its prey, the cichlid fish are capable of swimming at a more parallel position. The result is the cichlid fish are less likely to be detected by their prey as they pursue them. Like Darwins finches, the craniofacial evolution in the Perissodini involved discrete shifts in skeletal anatomy that reflect differences in habitat preference and predation strategies. Questions:-What are the implications of these studies in concerns to the humans?-How much time would an undergrad in your lab be expected to invest on a weekly basis?-What got you interested in your field of study?...
View Full Document

Page1 / 2

Assigment 7 - fishes that feed on the scales of their prey....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online