Adaptive Upgrading- Paper 2

Adaptive Upgrading- - Renee Reichl Section 1F Love Society and Society Will Love You Karma is a simple thing Some people believe in it some people

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February 25, 2008 Renee Reichl Section 1F Love Society and Society Will Love You
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Karma is a simple thing. Some people believe in it, some people don’t. Karma can be defined as: “the force generated by a person's actions held in Hinduism and Buddhism to perpetuate transmigration and in its ethical consequences to determine the nature of the person's next existence.” (Webster’s Dictionary) This is to say that in Hinduism and Buddhism, the belief is that the way a person behaves in one life can potentially effect how society and a “higher power” will treat the person in their reincarnated life. Karma and Talcott Parsons’ theory of adaptive upgrading almost go perfectly hand in hand with one another. “The core of Parsons’ evolutionary scheme is his idea of adaptive upgrading which essentially argues that modern society has the ability to creatively adapt to whatever problems it confronts and to continuously improve the quality of life for its members.”(Lecture Summary 6.) Actions that are carried out with abhorrence, selfishness, and greed are much more likely to endure the wrath of society’s rearing head. According to Parsons’ theory, “Society is internal, it is inside of us.” (Lecture Summary 7.) The functionalist perspective of sociology, which is associated with Talcott Parsons, suggests that instead of society restricting people like Weber and Marx theorized, society creates choice and helps socialize people into their surrounding environment. The only argument within Parsons’ theory is not that we don’t have enough choices, but that we have too many choices. Adaptive upgrading is essentially what creates Parsons’ ideology of “structured strain”, which can be defined as “the evolution or upgrading of something in society which takes time for social actors to adapt to.”(Lecture Summary 4.) The choices we make, natural social norms that we learn and participate in, and relationships we create with friends and family help create who we are. “It is through human contact
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that people learn to be members of the human community.” (Henslin 63) Therefore, socialization and “society makes us human.” (Henslin 63) In “Run, Lola, Run” Lola is faced with a situation that no girlfriend would ever want to be involved in. Her boyfriend, Manni, has apparently gotten mixed up in an apparent scheme that may potentially involve the mafia or some sort of illegal business. When he leaves a bag that he was supposed to give to his assumed boss that was chocked
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2012 for the course SOC 1 taught by Professor Jepsen during the Winter '08 term at UCLA.

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Adaptive Upgrading- - Renee Reichl Section 1F Love Society and Society Will Love You Karma is a simple thing Some people believe in it some people

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