SampleAbstract - VARIATION OF WHOLE-BODY ANGULAR AND LINEAR...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
INTRODUCTION Bipedal walking is a typical activity of daily living, but the overarching control strategy used by the central nervous system (CNS) to make this motion efficient, or even possible, remains unknown. Researchers in robotics have developed control strategies for bipedal gait through the regulation of central (i.e., about the mass center) angular momentum resolved along three orthogonal directions during the walking cycle. Although recent research has focused on conservation of whole-body central angular momentum as a possible control law for walking [1-3], there is little data to support this theory for other motions such as running or marching. Even less data exist for how whole-body linear momentum varies during human locomotion. This study investigated the extent to which whole-body central angular and linear momentum are conserved during walking, running, and marching. The goal was to determine whether minimization of central angular and linear momentum variations might provide a high- level control law for different types of human locomotion. METHODS We analyzed whole-body linear and central angular momentum during walking, running, and marching using motion capture and ground reaction data collected from a single healthy subject. The study was IRB approved and the subject gave informed consent. For each task, we collected five trials with clean force plate strikes for subsequent analysis. The experimental movement data were analyzed by modifying an existing dynamic full-body gait model (Fig. 1) [4]. The model was three dimensional and possessed 14 segments coordinated through 27 degrees of freedom. We derived the equations of motion for the model using Autolev symbolic manipulation software (OnLine Dynamics, Sunnyvale, CA). In addition, we used Autolev to derive equations for Fig. 1: Schematic of the 27 DOF full-body gait model used to analyze whole-body linear and central angular momentum during walking, running, and marching.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern