Bonferroni correction

Bonferroni correction - i for hypotheses H i(1< i< n...

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The Bonferroni correction is a multiple-comparison correction used when several dependent or independent statistical tests are being performed simultaneously (since while a given alpha value may be appropriate for each individual comparison, it is not for the set of all comparisons). In order to avoid a lot of spurious positives, the alpha value needs to be lowered to account for the number of comparisons being performed.
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The simplest and most conservative approach is the classic Bonferroni correction , which sets the alpha value for the entire set of n comparisons equal to α by taking the alpha value for each comparison equal to α/n. Explicitly, given n tests T
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Unformatted text preview: i for hypotheses H i (1 < i < n) under the assumption H o that all hypotheses H i are false, and if the individual test critical values T critical < α/n, then the underlying experiment-wide critical value is < α. In equation form, if… Pr(T i passes | H o ) < α/n, for 1 < i < n, then the probability that some test values pass is… Pr(some T i passes | H o ) < α . Another depiction of the critical alpha values can be found using the Sidak correction . Like Bonferroni, though less conservative, an adjusted critical value is used; in this case α s = 1 – (1 – α) 1/N , where N is the number of tests to be performed....
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Bonferroni correction - i for hypotheses H i(1< i< n...

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